No One Moves, Listens or Cares

by Liezl Groenewald | Published on 25 August 2017 for The Ethics Institute monthly newsletter

When I started working at The Ethics Institute nine years ago, no one told me that I would be traveling frequently.  I thought it was a cushy office job! But since I moved to Cape Town, travelling on a weekly basis became part of my existence. I am not complaining about it, but there are a few things at airports and in planes that never cease to amaze me.

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"Never take from the people you lead"

by Dr Paul Vorster | Published on 25 July 2017 for The Ethics Institute monthly newsletter

Being an industrial/organisational psychologist by profession, and working for years in the field of selection and assessment of leaders in industry, I have come across a large diversity of opinions about leadership. And the truth is, the more I have learned about different perspectives of leadership, the more confused I have become. It seems that everyone has an opinion on leadership: what it is, what is should be, and what it is not.

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Siemens Integrity Initiative

Business networks and individual businesses seldom have the appropriate expertise to implement internationally developed anti-corruption and good governance guidelines, standards and initiatives, and are often unaware of their existence.
This project aims to capacitate African business networks with the implementation of anti-corruption initiatives and good governance practices

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The power of consistency

© Frank J Navran

Ralph Waldo Emerson, in an essay entitled Self Reliance, first published in 1841, observed that: “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by statesmen, and philosophers and divines.”

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The importance of transparency

While transparency was originally defined as a matter of corruption as it existed in the relationships between businesses and governments, it has become a broader, more generic term in the past twenty years.

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Reflections on some business ethics tensions within organisations

The Ethics Institute adopts the definition of organisational ethics as the balancing of what is good for the organisation with what is good for other stakeholders. As reflected in the Institute’s  new corporate identity and logo, the definition is encapsulated in the classic ethics triangle (good, self and other). 

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Implementing Organizational Ethics as a Change Process

Considering Ethics as an organizational behavior, it comprises of principles and values of individuals in the organizational context with a focus on individual and group processes and actions.

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Nobody is as blind as those who cannot bear to see – psychoanalytic perspectives on the management of emotions and moral blindness

Why do good people with seemingly high moral values do bad things? Even people who can distinguish between right and wrong and make the decision to do what is right, often opt to do what is wrong.

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Ethics Management in the Public Sector is gaining momentum

Ethics management in the public sector has come a long way since its early days as part of government’s anti-corruption initiatives. The requirements for promoting ethics in the public service are nothing new.  The Constitution refers to the values of Public Administration and the Public Service Code of Conduct requires heads of department to promote ethical behaviour.  There might however initially have been a sense that these things would take care of themselves. 

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KISS - Keep It Simple, Stupid!

KISS is an old and familiar acronym that was once quite popular. It lost some of its attractiveness when “political correctness” started to constrain our word choices – when implying that our colleagues were “stupid” began to be frowned upon. Respect for each other has become a “core value” in nearly every organization and suggesting that one’s colleagues and/or employees (individually or collectively) are stupid is not respectful.

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Just Business and Just War

Eleven years of experience in applied Business Ethics in the public and private sector have sensitized me to the responsibilities of organisations to not only care for their internal and external stakeholders, but also the society and environment in which they operate. Although more and more corporations realise their responsibility for their actions and its impact on all its stakeholders, there are still those who either do not ask the degree of harm their activities can cause to the environment and societies, or seemingly do not care.

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Caveat Emptor! Alive and well and living in South Africa

Caveat emptor is Latin for "Let the buyer beware". It refers to a contract law principle mostly applied in the real estate industry, but may also be used to selling of other products and services. The phrase caveat emptor arises from the fact that buyers typically have less information about what they buy, while the seller has more information.

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